Thursday, 13 February 2014

Animal Tiles


Part of the floor in All Saints Church North Street, the stag and cross symbols I can understand. Any thoughts on the circular 'railway track'?

16 comments:

  1. That is most unusual! I can't say I've ever come across this same combination of symbols before. But I would take a stab at it and say that the tracks symbolize the human journey through life. What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I remember seeing a reference to eternity, something without a beginning or end. I like the journey interpretation though

      Delete
    2. Well, if the stag represents Christ and the cross holds out the promise of eternal life, then maybe the circular does in some sense represent the believer's eternal life/journey with God. Interesting!

      Delete
  2. Gorgeous! Railway track to commemorate opening of York station sometime in 19C?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The tiles might be older than the railway..... perhaps a glimpse into the future Chrissy!

      Delete
  3. Lovely! And with regards to that circle, I wonder if it is some kind of protection ... you know, against evil spirits and such ....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes, that is another good idea.

      Delete
  4. I have no idea on this one, Deb!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never mind, I am still impressed with your hagiographic knowledge!

      Delete
    2. Dave Williams of Hyde, Cheshire13 February 2014 at 21:35

      Perhaps it's supposed to represent a fence....

      Delete
  5. The first thing that comes to mind is a fence...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Deb, I have just found your wonderful blog, a couple of years too late. It is indeed a fence and is meant to represent a hunting park. Think 13th Century noblemen going out for a day's stag hunting. If you look at the stags on the tiles you will see each one is being pursued by a dog or hound. In the arms of the City of Derby you will see someting very similar, "Argent on a Mount Vert within Park Palings a Buck lodged between two Oak Trees fructed proper." http://www.civicheraldry.co.uk/derby.JPG
    "The stag at rest amid palings, known locally as 'the buck in the park', has been a badge of the City from time immemorial, and may have been derived from the white hart badge of Richard II"
    http://www.civicheraldry.co.uk/derbys.html
    If you do a Google search for images on "The Mystic Capture of the Unicorn Tapestries" you will find this was a common depiction of park railings, although your example in encaustic tiles has a much more limited amount of detail available.
    Hope you still read the comments. Regards. John

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John I do still have an email alert for any comments posted, I was delighted to receive your informative comments and links. Armed with my new knowledge I will revisit All Saints and take a look at the wider picture to see if any references to Derby or family coat of arms nearby.
      Many thanks, Deb

      Delete
  7. Deb, that's excellent news. I also must pay a visit to the chuch. It is many years since I was last in there. John

    ReplyDelete
  8. Deb, I have visited All Saints now. I had not appreciated from your photo how highly glazed the tiles were. They are not the medieval tiles I thought, but brand new (2012) tiles. These have been made to recreate medieval tiles known to have been in use in All Saints, although the samples in the nearby display case had no discernible pattern on them.
    Church warden Robert Richards said the new floor would be the first medieval-style pavement laid in an English church for more than 400 years.
    http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/9820304.York_church_to_be_restored_to_15th_century_form/?ref=rss
    There are a number of examples of hunting scenes on medieval tiles elsewhere. Regards. John

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the update John, how interesting, I took the floor photo some time ago so details a bit hazy. I last visited the outside of the church a couple of months ago. I was passing early Sunday morning and most unusually the side gate was open so I took the opportunity to walk down and take some photos of the hermit cell. Reconstructed in the early 20th century it has recently been re-restored. Usually this is hidden from public view but having seen the squint from inside the church I wanted to see what the accommodation looked like from the outside. Regards, Deb

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment on my blog. All comments are read, and I will try to answer any blog related questions.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...